Note: This calendar is subject to revision to take into account the progress of our class. No due dates will ever be earlier than those indicated. Unless otherwise noted, readings will be found in Concepts, Conversations, Critique, the English 100 Course Reader.

Sequence 1: Narrative

Week 1

January 22: Welcome to English 100

Class Introductions

Syllabus Overview

What is multimodality?

What is rhetoric?

Free write: What do I love about writing? What do I hate about writing?

Homework: Read “The Rhetorical Situation” handout

 

January 24: The Rhetorical Situation

Introduction to Rhetorical Analysis Practice rhetorical analysis in groups:

1. Ram Commercial: “Farmer” 

2. British Public Service Announcement: “OMG L@@K OUT!”

3. Public Service Website: Smokey Bear Website

4. Clip from Clueless: “Should all oppressed people be allowed refuge in America?” 

5. Clip from Friday Night Lights: “Being Perfect”

Homework: Read Syllabus and CCC pp 1-12, Read Dave Eggers’ “Serve or Fail,” and Anne Lamott’s “Shitty First Drafts”

 

Week 2

 

January 27: Argument Through Narrative

Review the Rhetorical Triangle

Analyze Eggers Using the Rhetorical Situation

Discuss Lamott

Introduce Writing Project 1

Introduce Short Assignment 1

Homework: Short Assignment 1, “Life as Research”

 

January 29: Narrating Arguments about American Culture

 

Due: Short Assignment 1

Review Eggers and the Concept of “Service”

Practice Rhetorical Analysis: Listen to This American Life “Babies Buying Babies”

Guiding Question: How does this essay use narrative to make a larger argument about materialism, race, and American culture?

Homework: Read Encomium handout, be prepared to answer questions about the encomium genre

 

January 31: Non-Humans Involved in the Rhetorical Situation

Review “Babies Buying Babies”

Free write: Who or what does my writing process involve?

Introduce Encomium genre and SA2

Visit from Chris McVey and the English 100 Tutorial!

Homework: Short Assignment 2: Encomium

 

Week 3

February 3: Writerly Influences

 

Due: Short Assignment 2

Writing Takeaways

Introduce Writing Workshops and Introduce Writing Project 1

Read selection from Peter Elbow’s Criterion and Reader Based Questions

Homework: Read George Orwell’s “Why I Write” and Joan Didion’s “Why I Write”

 

February 5: Introduction to Peer Review

Preview Elbow’s Criterion and Reader Based Questions

Discuss Orwell and Didion in 50 Words or Less

Model Peer Review

Homework: Finish Drafting First Draft of Writing Project 1 Bring 3 copies to class!

 

February 7: Revision Practice

 

Due: Draft 1 of Writing Project 1 for peer exchange—Must have 3 copies in class!

Review Economy of Language Exercise

Sign Up for Conferences

Vague Writing Exercise

Problems with Narrative Writing Exercise

Meet with Peer Groups to Preview “Writing History”

Homework: Read peers’ drafts as a reader-responder (feel free to mark comments on their drafts) and Choose questions to prepare for peer review

 

Week 4

February 10: Peer Review

 

Peer Review Homework: Revise Draft 1 of Writing History for submission BY EMAIL

 

February 12: Review Student Work

Review Conference Time

Show vs. Tell exercise

Due: Draft 2 of “Writing History” By Email before 10AM

 

February 14: Conferences

 

NO CLASS: Conferences

Week 5

February 17: Conferences

 

NO Class: Conferences

 

Sequence 2: Conversations: Engaging the Ideas of Others Through Research and Argumentation

 

February 19: Asking Research Questions

DUE: Writing Sequence 1 Portfolio (Revisions—if you choose—to SA1 and SA2, Writing Project One, Writer’s Memo) Please bring all portfolio materials in a folder

Introduce Writing Project 2

Introduce Discussion Assignment and Sign up for Discussion Days

Read and Discuss “How Today’s Computers Weaken Our Brain”

Homework: Read Stuart Greene, “Argument as Conversation” (CCC 24-37)

February 21: Joining the Conversation

Continue Discussing “How Today’s Computers Weaken Our Brain”

Free write: Building a Topic/Finding an Interest (You will include these free writes in your portfolio, so keep them handy!)

Discuss Stuart Greene, “Argument as Conversation” (CCC 24-37)

Homework: Read Whitney Erin Boesel’s “Social Media and the Devolution of Friendship” 

 

Week 6

February 24: Argumentative Writing: “The Art of Critique”

 

Discussants: Justin and Matt

Discuss “Social Media and the Devolution of Friendship”

Writing Exercise: How does Boesel critique?

Homework: Read Darrell Huff, “How to Lie With Statistics” (CCC 98-107) and Malcolm Gladwell’s “Something Borrowed” (CCC 71-84)

 

February 26: Assumptions, Warrants, and False Dichotomies

 

OWL Citations Resource

View Noreena Hertz’s “How to Use Experts and When Not to”

Discuss Huff and Gladwell Citations Exercise

Homework: Read Brielle James, “Improvements that Need Improving” (CCC 201-207) and View selected videos from “Target Women” – What argument is the author trying to make? How does the author use evidence to support, illustrate, or complicate that argument?

“Target Women: Feed Your Family”

“Target Women: Diets”

“Target Women: Chocolate”

 

February 28: Mediating Media

 

Discussants: Jessica and Emily 

Discuss James

View selected videos from “Target Women” – What argument is the author trying to make? How does the author use evidence to support, illustrate, or complicate that argument?

“Target Women: Feed Your Family”

“Target Women: Diets”

“Target Women: Chocolate”

Homework: View Eli Pariser’s “Beware of online ‘filter bubbles'”

Read “Are we stuck in filter bubbles?” 

 

Week 7

March 3: Who Controls Who—Media or Humans?

Discussants: Ciara and Rachel

Discuss “Beware of online ‘filter bubbles'”

Introduce Short Assignment 3

Homework: Begin Drafting Short Assignment 3 (Bring in three paper drafts for peer review)

March 5: Processing the Research Process

Discuss Researching as an Iterative Process

Peer Review: Workshop SA3

What potential subtopics could you include in your argument? (Keep these notes in a safe spot because you will include them in your portfolio!)

Homework: Short Assignment 3 and Read Paul Roberts, “How to Say Nothing in Five Hundred Words” (CCC 155-167), and read “Making Good Arguments”

March 7: Framing the Evidence: Ethics, Journalism, and Bias

 

DUE: SA3

Discuss Roberts

Claims, Evidence, Warrant Exercise

Paragraph Exercise

Introduce “Avoiding Bias” from Walden Writing Center

Homework: Complete Library CLUE Tutorial and print diplomas as evidence of completion

 

Week 8

March 10: Library Session

Meet in 1192D College Library for Librarian-Directed class in which students find sources or research materials for their topics, and learn about the UW Library System.

Homework: Read “What the F***” by Steven Pinker

 

March 12: Appropriate Speech

Discussants: Sean, Dara, and Anastasia

Review Research Tips from Library Day

Preview Short Assignment 4

Discuss Pinker

Introduce Cultural and Societal Knowledge Terms

Homework: Read Wilbert Cooper, “Miley Cyrus Needs to Take an African American Studies Class” and Watch “We Can’t Stop” and Begin Gathering Sources

 

March 14: Who Owns Culture?

Review Claims, Evidence Warrant Exercise

Discussants: Fred and Katie

Show “We Can’t Stop” video

Discuss Cooper’s Argument

Homework: Read Dave Strohecker, “Hipster Revivalism: Authentic Technologies”  and Christy Wampole, “How to live Without Irony”

Short Assignment 4

 

Spring Break: March 17-21

Week 9

March 24: Arguments about Social Media

Due: SA4 (by email)

Discussants: Josh and Nick 

Preview Schedule for Remainder of Sequence 2

Discuss Wampole and Strohecker articles

Homework: Read “They Say/I Say” excerpts

March 26: Entering the Conversation

“They Say/I Say” reading and exercise in class

Outlining Exercise

Homework: Continue drafting Writing Project 2 outline

 

March 28: What Does Good Writing Look Like?

Workshop Outlines

Homework: Read “The Poison Fish” by Ken Macrorie, Finish Draft 1 of Writing Project 2 and Bring 3 paper copies to class to exchange!

 

Week 10

March 31: Writing Moves That Matter

Sign Up for Conferences

Discuss Macrorie

Email Genre Exercise

Exchange Drafts with Peers

Homework: Read Peers’ drafts and prepare questions for peer review

 

April 2: Peer Review

 

Peer Review

Homework: Continue Draft 2 of Writing Project 2

 

April 4: In Class Writing Day

 

Transitions Exercise

Homework: Continue Revising Writing Project 2

DUE: First draft by 5PM, Final Draft DUE: April 11

 

Week 11
April 7: Conferences

No Class, Meet in Open Book Cafe for Conferences

Homework: Continue Revising Writing Project 2 DUE: April 11

 

April 9: Conferences

No Class, Meet in Open Book Cafe for Conferences

Homework: Continue Revising Writing Project 2 DUE: April 11

 

Sequence 3: Critique: Developing a Critical Approach by Enacting Arguments

 

April 11: Introducing Mediated Composition Practices

DUE: Writing Project 2

Preview Remainder of Sequence 3

Design Lab Resource

Preview Sequence 3 Project

Preview Short Assignment 5 “Project Proposal”

How to rhetorically analyze multimodal compositions?

View “MIDWAY a Message from the Gyre : a short film” by Chris Jordan

What argument does Jordan argue and what multimodal features does he deploy to do so?

View My Science Academy, “I Forgot My Phone”

What kind of comment or argument is this video making about the influence of new media on friendships? What kinds of research questions does it provoke, and what search terms would we use to begin researching?

Homework: Browse The Trevor Project website  and It Gets Better Project website

 

Week 12

April 14: Multimodal Negotiations: How far can Youtube reach?

 

Discussants: Sydney and Jenna

Discuss and Analyze Rhetorically The Trevor Project and It Gets Better Project websites Watch “The Future is Bright” 

Watch “President Obama: It Gets Better”

Watch “It Gets Better: Apple Employees”

Homework: SA5 and Read Ian Bogost’s Preface to Persuasive Games and Watch Jane Mcgonigal’s “Gaming Can Make A Better World” 

 

April 16: Gaming and Persuasive Procedures

 

Due: SA5 by EMAIL before class

Discussants: Euan and Cole

Discuss Bogost and Mcgonigal

Suggested Viewing: NPR’s “Video Game Creators are Using Apps to Teach Empathy” Homework: Listen to Erin Killian’s “Do Youz Know What I Meme?”  and Read Daniel Hamilton’s “Memes Defined” and “Memetic Rhetoric”

Meet with Peer Groups to Discuss SA5 and Plan for Projects

 

April 18: Multimodal Culture

Discussants: Cody and Adam

Listen to Erin Killian’s “Do Youz Know What I Meme?”

Discuss Killian and Hamilton Resource: “Know Your Meme”

Sign Up for Presentations Preview SOGC

 

Week 13

April 21: Going Viral

Watch Kevin Allocca “Why Videos Go Viral”

Review SOGC/Presentations Requirements

In class work day. Bring materials to work on in class.

Homework: Bring materials to discuss for Peer Review and Prepare Questions for Peer Review

 

April 23: In Class Work Day

In Class Work Day. Bring materials to work on in class.

 

April 25: Peer Review

Week 14

April 28: Student Presentations (not necessarily in this order)

Ciara

Justin

Cole

Emily

 

April 30: Student Presentations (not necessarily in this order)

Rachel

Jenna

Matt

Sean

 

May 2: Student Presentations (not necessarily in this order)

Frederique

Anastasia

Sydney

Euan

 Week 15

May 5: Student Presentations (not necessarily in this order)

 

Jessica

Cody

Dara

Josh

 

May 7: Student Presentations (not necessarily in this order)

Adam

Katie

Nick

 

May 9: Final Overview and Class Evaluations

 

See course assignments.